Monthly Archives: September 2015

Great Quotations 名人預言

Great Quotations

*** The religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. it should transcend personal God and avoid dogma and theology. Covering both natural and spiritual, it should be based on religious sense arising from experience of all things natural and spiritual as a meaningful unity. Buddhism answers this description. If there is any religion that could cope with modern scientific needs ( and spiritual needs),   it would be Buddhism.    _________ Albert Einstein __________

*** The coming of Buddhism to the West may very well prove to be the most important event of the twentieth century.            _________ Arnold Toynbee _________(Historian)

*** When the iron birds flies, and horses running on wheels, the Tibetan people will be scattered like ants across the world, and the Dharma will come to the land of red-faced people.

______ Padma Sambhava _____ (8th century Indian Guru and founder of the first Tibetan monastery.

Also Guru of Tantric Vajrayana Buddhism)
*** Do not do anything harmful, do only what is good; purify and train your mind. This is the teaching of the Buddha; this is the path to enlightenment.                  ________ The Buddha ________

*** How wonderful! How wonderful!

All things are perfect!

Exactly as they

Are!                           ________ The Buddha ________

Note: Means all things in enlightened mind are “Suchness”, Perfectly as is! ( Due to cause and effect)

*** For those who understand, no explanation is needed.

For those who do not understand, no explanation is possible.

Bodhicitta 菩提心

Bodhicitta 菩提心

Bodhicitta is a spontaneous wish to attain enlightenment motivated by great compassion for all sentient beings, accompanied by attaining the wisdom of detachment to the illusion of an inherently existing self.

The mind of great compassion and bodhicitta motivates one to attain enlightenment Buddhahood, as quickly as possible and benefit all sentient beings through their emanations and other skillful means.

Bodhicitta is a felt need to replace others’ suffering with bliss. Since the ultimate end of suffering is nirvana, bodhicitta necessarily involves a motivation to help others to awaken (to find bodhi). A person who has a spontaneous realization or motivation of bodhicitta is called a bodhisattva.

(The present fourteenth Dalai Lama, for instance, regarded Mother Teresa as one of the greatest modern bodhisattvas.)

Different schools may demonstrate alternative understandings of bodhicitta. There are two types of bodhicitta ; relative and absolute (or ultimate) bodhicitta. Relative bodhicitta is a state of mind in which the practitioner works for the good of all beings as if it were his own. Absolute bodhicitta is the wisdom of sunyata (a Sanskrit term often translated as “emptiness”), The concept of sunyata in Buddhist thought does not refer to nothingness, but to freedom from attachments, and from fixed ide There are two types of bodhicitta ; relative and absolute (or ultimate) bodhicitta. Relative bodhicitta is a state of mind in which the practitioner works for the good of all beings as if it were his own. Absolute bodhicitta is the wisdom of sunyata (a Sanskrit term often translated as “emptiness”), The concept of sunyata in Buddhist thought does not refer to nothingness, but to freedom from attachments, and from fixed ideas about the world and how it should be.

as about the world and how it should be.

Some bodhicitta practices emphasize the absolute , while others emphasize the relative, but both aspects are seen in all Mahayana practice as essential to enlightenment. Without the absolute, the relative can degenerate into pity and sentimentality, whereas the absolute without the relative can lead to lack of desire to engage other sentient beings for their benefit.

A bodhisattva is like that of the shepherd, who makes sure that all his sheep arrive safely ahead of him and places their welfare above his own.

Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism propagates the Bodhisattva-ideal, in which the Six perfections are being practiced. Arousing bodhicitta is part of this Bodhisattva-ideal.

The goal of Buddhist practice is primarily to be reborn infinite numbers of times to liberate all sentient beings from Samsara

Recommended readings:

Santideva’s “A Guide to the Bodhisattva’s way of Life. (c. 700 CE),

Thogme Zangpo’s “Thirty-Seven Practice of a Bodhisattva. (12th century CE),

Langgri Tanpa’s “Verses for training the Mind. (12th century CE),

Gashe Chekhawa’s “Training the Mind in Seven Point. ( 12th century CE.)

Developing of Bodhicitta 啟發菩提心

Developing of Bodhicitta 啟發菩提心

Developing of Bodhicitta in all Mahayana practice is essential to enlightenment. therefore it is important to discuss a bit more on this topic.

There are two types of bodhicitta ; relative and absolute (or ultimate) bodhicitta. Relative bodhicitta is a state of mind in which the practitioner works for the good of all beings as if it were his own. Absolute bodhicitta is the wisdom of sunyata (a Sanskrit term often translated as “emptiness”), The concept of sunyata in Buddhist thought does not refer to nothingness, but to freedom from attachments, and from fixed ideas about the world and how it should be. Both aspects are essential to enlightenment.

Mahayana and Vajrayana traditions practice “The four Immeasurables” and “Six Paramitas” to develop Bodhicitta.

Among the many methods for developing uncontrived Bodhicitta given in Mahayana teachings are:

The Four Immeasurables :

Immeasurable Loving : Wishing all beings have happiness and the Cause of happiness.

Immeasurable Compassion: Wishing all beings liberated from suffering and cause of suffering.

Immeasurable Joy in the Good Fortune of Others: happy to see good things happened to others, not with any trace of envious and jealousy .

Immeasurable Equanimity: See all being with equality , without prejudice and differentiation.

The Six Paramitas:

Generosity ( Dana ): 佈施 the attitude of giving; giving assistance of monetary, time, comfort and Dharma teaching etc. without the thoughts of “I” give, without the thought of I give “such, such”, and without the thought of “whom” received what I give. This is practice of ” Emptiness / Detachment of giving”.

Discipline ( Sila ): 持戒 virtue, morality, , proper conduct; is practice of “Discipline” in the Eight-Fold-Path. Refrain from false speech, frivolous speech, divisive speech, idle chatting, harmful actions such as stealing, killing, sexual misconduct, intoxicants.

Tolerance ( Ksanti /kshanti ): 忍辱patience, forbearance, acceptance, endurance, inclusiveness; Recognize that in the human realm, there are many, many different levels of intelligence of minds, each project their views based on their own perceptions, to themselves, they are perfectly “right”, even though they might be very wrong. For us as Buddhist practitioners, it is an opportunity to incorporate all situations into the Path of practice; by transforming any negative situations as an opportunity to overcome it, and better yet, into a positive one. for example; In a group setting, can you extend your friendship to someone who no one likes? or to love the “unlovable”?

Diligence (Virya ): 精進energy, , vigor, effort; here means put great effort towards achieve state of Enlightenment, including diligent in studding, understanding, and practicing the Buddhist path, taking time to do meditation .

Meditation(Dhyana ): 禪定one-pointed concentration, contemplation, insight meditation.

Meditation also meant ongoing clear minded awareness of all phenomena. This is how you can “Watch” your own actions, speech, and thoughts /thinking.

Wisdom (Prajna) 智慧 (般若 ): Superior insight, correct views and understanding of all people and things, ability to see the true nature of reality.

The Tibetan Buddhism also teaches “tonglin” practice, in which one breath-in others pain and suffering, and in exchange, breath-out by sending them love and joy. And “Lojong” practice (a mind training); viewing all sentient beings as mothers of many previous lives, and feeling gratitude for their love and care for us.

Two Practice Lineages

Tibetan Buddhists maintain that there are two main ways to cultivate Bodhichitta, the “Seven Causes and Effects” that originates from Maitreya and was taught by Atisha, and “Exchanging Self and Others,” taught by Shantideva and originally by Manjushri.

According to Tsongkapa the seven causes and effects are thus:

  1. recognizing all beings as your mothers;
  2. recollecting their kindness;
  3. the wish to repay their kindness;
  4. love;
  5. great compassion;
  6. wholehearted resolve;
  7. bodhichitta.

According to Pabongka Rinpoche the second method consists of the following meditations:

  1. how self and others are equal;
  2. contemplating the many faults resulting from self-cherishing;
  3. contemplating the many good qualities resulting from cherishing others;
  4. the actual contemplation on the interchange of self and others;
  5. with these serving as the basis, the way to meditate on giving and taking [tong len].

Atisha’s “Lamp for the Path to Enlightenment” (982-1054)

Santideva’s “A Guide to the Bodhisattva’s way of Life. (c. 700 CE),

Thogme Zangpo’s “Thirty-Seven Practice of a Bodhisattva. (12th century CE),

Langgri Tanpa’s “Verses for training the Mind. (12th century CE),

Gashe Chekhawa’s “Training the Mind in Seven Point. ( 12th century CE.)

Brief introduction of Tibetan Buddhism 西 藏 佛教簡介

Brief introduction of Tibetan Buddhism 西 佛教簡介

   *** Gelug(pa), (Yellow Hat) 黃帽

The “Way of Virtue” school was originally a reformist movement and is known for its emphasis on logic and debate. The order was founded in the 14th to 15th century by Je Tsongkhapa (1357 – 1419) , renowned for both his scholarship and virtue. Based on the foundations of the Kadampa tradition, Lam Rim practice is the cord teaching.

The Dalai Lama belongs to the Gelugpa school and is regarded as the embodiment of Chenrezig, the Bodhisattva of Compassion (the equivalent of Avalokitesvara).

*** Kagyu(pa), (Red hat) 紅帽

“Lineage of the (Buddha’s) Word”. This is an oral tradition which is very much concerned with the experiential dimension of meditation.This school very much represents the scholarly tradition.

Important and famous Kagyupa teachers includes; Tilopa 帝若巴 ( 988-1069), Naropa 那若巴 ( 1016-1100 )

Marpa   馬爾巴 ( 1012-1097), Milarepa密勒日巴( 1040 to1123 ) Gampopa 岡波巴 (1079~1153)

A twentieth century Great teacher Kalu Rinpoche, 17th Karmapa 十七世大寶法王 Born in 1986, the head of the Karma Kagyu sect of Tibetan Buddhism, (He was invited to America for a two-month visit in the spring 2015)

***Nyingma(pa), (Red hat) 紅帽

The oldest and original order founded by Padmasambhava, a Tibetan master, who taught very early esoteric scriptures known as tantras. In this school there is a good deal of emphasis placed on meditation. While other schools categorize their teachings into the three yānas or “vehicles”, Hinayana, Mahayana and Vajrayana, the Lyingma tradition classifies its teachings into Nine Yānas, among the highest of which is Dzogchen. Terma ” hidden treasures”. Padmasambhava 蓮華生大士 ( 7th-8th Century ) Referred by Tibetans as “Guru Rinpoche” (Precious Teacher).

Noted in the West for the teachings of the Tibetan Book of the Dead.

*** Sakya(pa), (Red hat) 紅帽The “Grey Earth” school represents the scholarly tradition. this tradition was founded by Khön Könchok Gyelpo (1034–1102), a disciple of the great lotsāwa Drogmi Shākya and traces its lineage to the mahasiddha Virūpa. A renowned exponent, Sakya Pandita (1182–1251CE), was the great-grandson of Khön Könchok Gyelpo. This school very much represents the scholarly tradition