Daily Archives: September 21, 2015

Bodhicitta 菩提心

Bodhicitta 菩提心

Bodhicitta is a spontaneous wish to attain enlightenment motivated by great compassion for all sentient beings, accompanied by attaining the wisdom of detachment to the illusion of an inherently existing self.

The mind of great compassion and bodhicitta motivates one to attain enlightenment Buddhahood, as quickly as possible and benefit all sentient beings through their emanations and other skillful means.

Bodhicitta is a felt need to replace others’ suffering with bliss. Since the ultimate end of suffering is nirvana, bodhicitta necessarily involves a motivation to help others to awaken (to find bodhi). A person who has a spontaneous realization or motivation of bodhicitta is called a bodhisattva.

(The present fourteenth Dalai Lama, for instance, regarded Mother Teresa as one of the greatest modern bodhisattvas.)

Different schools may demonstrate alternative understandings of bodhicitta. There are two types of bodhicitta ; relative and absolute (or ultimate) bodhicitta. Relative bodhicitta is a state of mind in which the practitioner works for the good of all beings as if it were his own. Absolute bodhicitta is the wisdom of sunyata (a Sanskrit term often translated as “emptiness”), The concept of sunyata in Buddhist thought does not refer to nothingness, but to freedom from attachments, and from fixed ide There are two types of bodhicitta ; relative and absolute (or ultimate) bodhicitta. Relative bodhicitta is a state of mind in which the practitioner works for the good of all beings as if it were his own. Absolute bodhicitta is the wisdom of sunyata (a Sanskrit term often translated as “emptiness”), The concept of sunyata in Buddhist thought does not refer to nothingness, but to freedom from attachments, and from fixed ideas about the world and how it should be.

as about the world and how it should be.

Some bodhicitta practices emphasize the absolute , while others emphasize the relative, but both aspects are seen in all Mahayana practice as essential to enlightenment. Without the absolute, the relative can degenerate into pity and sentimentality, whereas the absolute without the relative can lead to lack of desire to engage other sentient beings for their benefit.

A bodhisattva is like that of the shepherd, who makes sure that all his sheep arrive safely ahead of him and places their welfare above his own.

Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism propagates the Bodhisattva-ideal, in which the Six perfections are being practiced. Arousing bodhicitta is part of this Bodhisattva-ideal.

The goal of Buddhist practice is primarily to be reborn infinite numbers of times to liberate all sentient beings from Samsara

Recommended readings:

Santideva’s “A Guide to the Bodhisattva’s way of Life. (c. 700 CE),

Thogme Zangpo’s “Thirty-Seven Practice of a Bodhisattva. (12th century CE),

Langgri Tanpa’s “Verses for training the Mind. (12th century CE),

Gashe Chekhawa’s “Training the Mind in Seven Point. ( 12th century CE.)